Monetize a hobby. While some hobbies actually cost money, others can be transformed into a profitable business venture. Ultimately, it depends on what your hobby is and how talented you are. You could turn your love of photography, for example, into a part-time gig taking family portraits and wedding photos or selling prints on Etsy or at arts fairs.
So, I had to do something. While some of these work at home sites (e.g. customer service companies) do require some type of training or experience, the ones that don’t were the way to go. Yes, it’s been a learning experience even for me and it’ll take some time for me to build my website (once I get around to it). But, I had very, very little options from the getgo. I was practically shoved out of the job market and that’s something very few people (especially those in my family) understood.
From caterers to bands to florists, saying “I do” is big business. And now there’s a new niche in the $58 billion wedding industry that could score you a little dough. Bridesmaid for Hire provides professional services for brides. While some of the tasks involve helping out on the big day (or even standing with the wedding party as an actual bridesmaid), many responsibilities are handled remotely via emails and social media.

It’s an excellent opportunity to offer technical training courses that teach people how to learn a much-needed skill, or accomplish an important task. It could also prove to be an important testing ground for your educational courses. If you are able to market your course on the site, against direct competition, you may be able to direct marketing to the general public, using a website, videos, or even an affiliate marketing program.
 @Philip Taylor I was merely using medical science as an example profession. It’s quite obvious that you don’t have any professional courtesy and downplay professions in which you don’t understand. Logo design isn’t just logo design. I don’t know what the profession of a public accountant entails, or a lawyer perhaps, so I’m not going to give advice on matters that I don’t especially have knowledge in.
Holly told me she started writing content in 2011. At the time, she still worked a full-time job but created content online part-time to supplement her income. Over time, she was able to double and triple her rates until she could quit her full-time job to write. These days, she makes bank as a freelance writer and teaches others to do the same via her online course, Earn More Writing.
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