Another way to utilize your talent and business skills is to run corporate workshops online. Businesses are always looking for unique ways to help educate their workforce, and if you can package your talents into a day or half-day long session, you can sell that to companies all over the world to make money online. Start by building a portfolio and then reaching out on LinkedIn to influencers at relevant companies to see if they would be interested in you teaching their team.
We like Stash because they give you $5 cash just for signing up!. Once you download their app, you are asked to select a portfolio of stocks and ETFs, based on who you are and what you care about. For example, you may be passionate about space exploration or tech companies or environmentally conscious corporations. Based on what you say, Stash will recommend a portfolio. They charge only $1 a month and the app serves you regular investment education articles so you are learning as you go.
Rent out a room on Airbnb. Living near a tourist area has its perks, including the prospect of renting out a room for a profit. With home sharing sites like Airbnb, you can rent out a room in your home – or even the entire place – for a day, a week, or longer. If you have extra space and might enjoy the company of travelers, renting out a room is great way to earn some extra money with little effort on your part. See our post, “How to Make Money as an AirBNB Host.”

Oh, my! That is quite a comprehensive list of ways to make extra money. I think many folks are looking to make an extra buck – especially online. And somehow just because it is online, they think it should be easy as well. My experience is that most of the money making ideas are good but need persistence and follow up before they start generating serious coin.
The stuff you can't sell online, you could sell from your garage on the weekends. Many neighborhoods plan annual or bi-annual yard sales. If you have items to sell, this is a great time to do it as the neighborhood as a whole can bring in a lot of traffic and help you perform better than you would on your own. If that's not possible, consider partnering up with a couple of families in a popular neighborhood.

If you have nice items like cameras and other A/V items, musical instruments, drones, and even toys and other children's items, you can list it online for rent. One of the best places to do this is a funky site called Fat Llama. People are reporting to have made over $1,000 renting out equipment on this platform. Plus, if you sign up using this link, Fat Llama will give you a $20 credit! Get $20 credit with Fat Llama.

If you’re serious about making money selling things online, it’s pretty much impossible to not recommend Shopify. The platform gives you everything you need to get your online store up and running in less than a day including a custom domain, beautiful templates (so you don’t need design skills), secure payment options, and they can even take care of marketing and shipping for you. Whether you’re promoting your own products, designs, or curating other products for people in your niche, Shopify is the best option for powering your online store.
However, people can still do webinars without all of that. For example, you might have a sizable social media following and you train them every week on something to do with social media. But you will need a product to embed and sell at some point. Don't worry about it in the beginning. And by far, the best webinar platform out there is certainly GoToWebinar. Hands down, there isn't even another platform that comes close.
When creating a membership site, always offer different plans and pricing tiers to appeal to your different categories of audience. Access to specific types of content is then dependent on the plan selected by a member. Membership fees can be a one-off payment or a repeat subscription. And you can even sell products on your membership site to boost your income.
If you’re good with Photoshop and can work quickly you might make some decent cash with this online business. Are you a graphic designer or do you have some artistic talents that you know others are looking for? Why not make extra money for your bottom line by designing logos or other graphics for people's websites, for their newsletters or for other print applications?
Commercial use requires 'releases' - editorial use doesn't. Stock photos can be sold for commercial (eg, marketing) or editorial (ie, journalistic) use. You'll have more opportunities to make cash if your photos are available for both, but photos containing people or property (including branding and logos) need signed releases to be sold commercially.

Hey Dasjung . . . The Nike logo was bought for (I beleive) close to 35.00 from a college student.  THAT is what is being talked about.  The Nike logo is BY FAR on of the most recognized logos in the world, so maybe you should take a second look at the world.  Just because someone isn’t trained doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be able to make money with their talents.  The hard truth is training is not necessary to practice graphic design, just preffered, where as being a doctor REQUIRES the training.  For EXAMPLE, I can go out into the world and become a manager of a business if I have the knowledge WITHOUT any training in the Business Management profession.  Deal with it, Just because you have training in Graphic Design doesn’t mean that you and your peers are the only ones who can create a logo.  Logos are one of those things that can either be elaborate (in which someone might come to you), or simple (in which someone might come to anyone who has shown the ability to do so).  


If you’ve got a way with words and expertise in a niche, there are plenty of sites that will pay for articles and content you write. Think of the sites you read regularly. What can you contribute to them that would be interesting? Research your niche and then look for ways to pitch articles. Many sites will simply have a submission or contact link in the footer. To get started, check out my full guide to becoming a freelance writer on the side and then submit your articles to places like Instash, Listverse, TopTenz, A List Apart, International Living, FundsforWriters, and Textbroker.

Robert said he did an average of 4-6 of these gigs per year for a while depending on his schedule and the work involved. The best part is, he charged a flat rate that usually worked out to around $100 per hour. And remember, this was pay he was earning to advise people on the best ways to use social media tools like Facebook and Pinterest to grow their brands.
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