Take it seriously. Yes, you’re applying for an online job. Yes, you can do the work in your underwear, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a “real job”. You must treat it as such or they aren’t going to treat you as a serious candidate. You aren’t the only one who wants to work in their underwear. In fact, the competition online is likely higher than it is in your local area.
Most companies who hire freelancers want the best and rightly so. You find that ALL of the freelance work requires some specialized skills. If you are not already an expert, you will have to take the time to learn. Earning a living online takes time and commitment. It may take five or ten years to build up your business or expertise. Realistically, you will be working long hours for pennies, but your bills won’t wait for you to get rich, so In the meantime, MacDonalds is hiring!
The Chase Freedom Unlimited offers 1.5% cash back on all purchases. You can redeem that as straight cash, a statement credit, or as gift cards to many different merchants. Thanks to a 0% introductory APR, lack of annual fee, and sign-up bonus, Insider Picks reporter David Slotnick calls it a no-brainer and "the perfect card for just about everyone."
Do you search the Internet? Want to get paid for it? Swagbucks is a site that rewards you for doing various online tasks like taking surveys, watching videos, and using their search engine. When using their search engine, you get reward points after several searches, usually in the amount of 10-15 points. You can start cashing out rewards at the 500 points mark.
TaskRabbit. Are you willing to get your hands dirty? (Nothing shifty … we're talking, like, weeding somebody's garden.) People come to this site to find those willing to do various tasks for them, such as putting together a bookcase or running an errand for them. Do as many tasks as you want, and this could become quite the part-time (or full-time) job.
And while it will take time to build up a big-enough audience to attract advertisers and other ways to make extra income from your podcast, the opportunity is there. John Lee Dumas interviews entrepreneurs seven days a week for his podcast Entrepreneur on Fire and now makes more than $200,000 a month from it. In fact, John publishes all his income online and showed that he’s made almost $13 million since launching in 2012.
Fiverr. This is a popular website that can be helpful for freelancers with actual skills. Know something about digital animation? You can work for someone who doesn't and pick up some extra cash. But if you just have a brain but few skills, you can offer to do web research for someone, and maybe someone will hire you. Just know that you probably aren't going to get rich doing these jobs. The website's tag line is, "Freelance services for the lean entrepreneur," which tells you right away the pay is – meh. Plus, the website's name comes from the fact that many people work for $5 per task (but, yes, you can ask for more). Still, if you get a lot of gigs, it can add up.
Evaluate Web sites. Another way to make extra cash in a short amount time – $10 for about 20 minutes of work – is to sign on with UserTesting and evaluate Web sites. You need a computer with a microphone and Internet connection, and you’ll have to fill out a one-page demographic profile. You’ll receive work if your profile matches that of the target audience of sites being tested. Then it’s just a matter of using UserTesting’s screen recorder, which you'll need to download to your computer, to record your verbal comments and on-screen movements as you click through a site. Site owners typically are looking for feedback about whether the Web site is confusing to navigate.

If you have a fondness and talent for taking pictures you can make extra money online by becoming a stock photographer and selling your images to a stock photo company like ShutterStock or iStockPhoto. You’ll get royalties every time someone licenses an image you’ve submitted. To really be successful, build your own photography website to be able to showcase your portfolio and start getting higher-paid private corporate work.


Holly told me she started writing content in 2011. At the time, she still worked a full-time job but created content online part-time to supplement her income. Over time, she was able to double and triple her rates until she could quit her full-time job to write. These days, she makes bank as a freelance writer and teaches others to do the same via her online course, Earn More Writing.
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