For example, if you type in “banana bread recipe,” search engines should pull up recipes from major sites first. Posts from smaller blogs or recipes for other, related dishes—like zucchini bread—should fall toward the end of the list. As a search engine evaluator, you’ll be asked to enter specific words or phrases into a search engine, then assess how appropriate and informative the sites it pulls up are.
Is there a product or service that you are particularly enthusiastic about? If you are, you may be able to develop a website that is built around selling it. You don’t have to be the actual provider of the product or service either. There are many businesses that offer these products and will allow you to sell them on an affiliate basis. For example, you may be able to sell a product on your website for a commission of 20% or 30% of the sale price.
It’s something akin to picking stocks. You want to buy undervalued domains, and sell them later on at a higher price. For example, you can pick a domain that is out of favor, but could be related to some future event. So if you decide that the stock market is likely to crash in the future, you can buy a domain that includes the words stock market crash during a rising market, and then sell it in a falling market.
Consider your expertise. If you take the time to reflect on your experiences, you will realize that you have more knowledge about which to write than you might think. Begin by listing three assets that define you, such as your profession, a special hobby or a personality trait. Next, list three things that inspire you, such as religion, education or charity. Finally, list three of your dreams, such as getting married, traveling or spending more time with your children. These three lists should give you many ideas of topics about which you can write.[13]
Webinars are quite possibly one of the most potent ways you can make an exorbitant amount of money online. Russell Brunson often says that if you do a webinar every single week for a year, you'll be a millionaire at the end of it. You'll need an audience to train and you'll need to know what you're talking about. Of course, this usually requires having a website and some semblance of an online presence.

OfferUp.com. If you don't have the energy to hold a yard sale, OfferUp may be the next best, profitable thing. Sell one thing at a time. Take a picture of what you have, put down a price and hopefully somebody nearby will see it online, love it enough to buy it, send you a note and you'll meet – in a public place, OfferUp's website recommends – and you can get your cash for whatever you're selling. Of course, you might ask how this is different than selling on, say, the ever-popular Craigslist. Some users claim that it's an easier site to post on, and members have profiles, so you can rate each other and get a better sense that people are who they say they are, which isn't always the case on Craigslist. Nevertheless, you'd still do well to use common sense and buy and sell OfferUp items in public places rather than at someone's home or in the dark woods.


Mechanical Turk is Amazon's take on micro-jobs. These are small miniscule-jobs that you can do for other people, which they call HITs, or Human Intelligence Tasks. These are super simple tasks that anyone can do. Some examples are listing off some URLs with certain kinds of images for one cent, or recording a few phrases with a microphone for 6 cents.
You can potentially make even more money by offering to handle snow removal in the winter. Shoveling snow is often a homeowner's least favorite job, and there are many homeowners who simply cannot handle their own shoveling because of physical limitations. Typically, snow removal companies charge a flat fee for the winter, no matter how many times it snows. You can offer to remove snow a la carte, or you can copy the standard procedure and charge a flat rate. If you already own a snowblower (or can invest in one), this can help you speed up the snow removal process and allow you to take care of multiple neighbors each time it snows. (A snowblower will also save your back muscles!)
Great list! I’ve used Poshmark to sell clothes/accessories. You take up to 4 photos, add a description, and set a size, color, and brand. I’ve sold 3 items so far (two dresses and a pair of shoes) and it’s easy. The buyer can purchase at listing price or make you an offer, to which you can counter-offer. At all times, you can see what your profit will be from your listed price. Once the transaction is accepted, you are emailed a prepaid shipping label to print. You package your item up in a brown box and ship, and when the seller receives it your funds are released. You can cash out as a direct deposit to a bank account at any time or use the funds to shop. I’ve also purchased a pair of jeans on the site and they arrived as expected. For like-new and designer labels it’s a great way to clear your closet and make a little cash all at once.
Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.
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