I see what both of you are saying, but for people like me a little extra money here and there is what we need to sort of stay afloat. Of course, I am getting help from a relative that I’m living with at the moment (and I thank my father dearly for helping me all these years). However, in my situation, getting a job isn’t easy. First of all, I have high functioning Autism and don’t have much work experience. People from the past two job agencies I’ve been to since becoming an adult they both told me that it’ll be hard for me to find a job because of the second factor I listed above. Nowadays in this economy, it’s an unwritten rule out there that says you have to have your first job while still in high school. Believe me it was a shock the first and second time I wasn’t that employable when I was only 18.
It may take time to build that audience that turns views into dollars. The average revenue per 1,000 YouTube views is just over $6. But with enough videos for fans to scroll through, those views can add up over time. While you’re building an audience, you could also join an affiliate program related to your channel and make money online through affiliate links in your video descriptions.
It’s something akin to picking stocks. You want to buy undervalued domains, and sell them later on at a higher price. For example, you can pick a domain that is out of favor, but could be related to some future event. So if you decide that the stock market is likely to crash in the future, you can buy a domain that includes the words stock market crash during a rising market, and then sell it in a falling market.
Get creative and sell yourself! (it's not what you think) There's a company called Fiverr that connects people who can do things for other people. We all have talents and some of them can be quite marketable. For example, you could offer to design logos, create online content, put together scrapbooks, paint a pretty picture or even lending your voice to a podcast! Gigs start at $5 but a person can make much, much more. Listen to my podcast episode with a successful Fiverr creator and Sign up with Fiverr today.
It shows your true ignorance by calling someone an idiot. In no way was this thread used to alienate anyone, but merely having a heated discussion of professions and their importance. If you didn’t read my comment correctly, I said…”for example.” I know the difference between graphic design and being a surgeon. Those of you who are obviously majorly left-brained will never understand the creative industry. You’re right, anyone can be a bad designer, or a bad surgeon, or a bad accountant coordinator…etc. That’s why there exists terrible brand identities, malpractice suits, etc as well. All I was saying that the creative industry shouldn’t be held below the threshold of what is real and what is a fake profession. All professions should be respected in their own right. Period.
Or you can take dog walking a step further and get paid to take a dog in while the owner is away! Have you ever checked to see what it costs to board a pet? Those places are not cheap! Do some research and charge 10 – 20% less. Post your ads on Craigslist or around town. But don't expect people to just leave their loved one with a stranger. Make sure you offer your references and that you have all their necessary information if Fido gets injured or sick. Rover can help you here, too – Become a Pet Sitter.
Here’s a good example of how lead sales can work in real life: My second website, Life Insurance by Jeff, brings in a ton of traffic from people who are searching the web to find answers to life insurance questions. While I used to have the website set up so I could sell these people life insurance myself, it was a lot of work to process all the different requests and clients. As a result, I started selling the leads I gathered instead.
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